Is Your Memory Not Great? This Is For You!

Imagine having all of your memories vanish one by one, until you are essentially much like a over-sized newborn baby. Alzheimer's disease is a disease that affects a persons memory, and can be devastating to the diagnosed loved-one's family. This article will give you and your family some tips for coping with the emotional stress involved with this disease.

If you have noticed that your memory isn't what it used to be, maybe you aren't getting enough sleep. You need to be sleeping seven to eight hours each night in order to improve your memory. During your sleep cycle, your brain processes all new information to create these memories for you so you have them to recall later.

The phrase "use it or lose it" definitely applies to your memory. Make time to engage in activities that require you to recall information, such as crossword puzzles, learning a new skill or reading. Teaching someone else is also a good way to make active use of your memory and prevent it from becoming rusty.

The best way to improve your memory if you're studying, is to add structure to what you're attempting to learn. Categorizing and taking things one step at a time, will allow you to learn and to retain the knowledge of a previous subject, before you move on to the next. This is undoubtedly the best way to study.

If you are scatterbrained, use post-it notes to your advantage. Place them in areas you freqently look at, like near a cell phone or computer. These notes will make sure that you don't forget things that are important.

Drink more milk for healthy brain activity for life. Milk is a veritable treasure trove of B vitamins, potassium, magnesium and calcium that all have incredibly important functions for taking care of your brain. These vitamins and minerals do a great job in supporting the functions of your brain. The healthier the brain, the better the memory will be.

To improve absorbing and remembering things, try using Mnemonics tricks. These are mind games that are often used by children in school when trying to learn things. For example, people use "I before E, except after C" to remember that in the English language, the letter "I" always goes before "E" in words, except after the letter "C".

Writing by hand is a great way to help your memory. Writing with a pen or pencil engages your brain in a different way than typing on a computer. You can either copy out a speech your trying to memorize or keep track of your daily to do list by writing in a calendar. If you've written it out, you may be able to remember without even checking your list!

If you are finding your memory is lacking it may be because of a lack of sleep. As such try getting more rest. Scientists believe that when we are asleep it is when our brain sorts through the events of our lives and files them away, like a librarian and a filing cabinet. They also believe this is why we dream.

Exercise your body - exercise your brain. By exercising regularly, you increase the amount of oxygen that gets to your brain, and reduce the risk of illnesses that can contribute to memory loss, such as heart disease and diabetes. Exercise can also increase the effects of certain chemicals that help the brain to function at its best.

If you notice that you are having trouble with your memory, you may want to try running or riding a bicycle on a regular basis. Medical research has shown that running and bicycle riding stimulates the growth of new brain cells, which in turn, helps to improve a person's memory.

To keep your memory in tip-top shape, practice using it regularly. If you don't use your memory, it will slowly become weaker and weaker over time. The best way to keep it in shape is by regularly challenging it in your day to day life. This can be something as simple as doing a crossword puzzle or as complex as trying to memorize the names of all of the members of the arachnid family. Just find fun ways to test and challenge your memory each and every day.

In order to remember important things, you may want to enlist the help of family or friends who have good memories. Tell them the important information you want to remember, so that you can ask them at a later date to remind you of this information. Just do not rely on someone else who has a bad memory!

If you are having a hard time remembering things, you may want to put information with a picture. For instance, say you want to remember where a certain store is and there is a big oak tree in front of me, tell your mind to think of the oak tree.

If you are studying complicated information that you know nothing about, try to link it to a topic that you are very familiar with. You will be able to recall the unfamiliar material much better if you are able to associate it with something that is easy for you to understand.

The next time your memory fails to help you remember where you placed something, be sure to jog your memory. Try to remember where you last placed something and how long ago it was. From now on, try to keep your items in the same place so you do not forget where they are.

When you are trying to learn something new and you want to remember it, associate with something you already know. For instance, let's say you are learning a new phone number, remember it by thinking of a similar phone number. You have a better chance of keeping new information brain supplements this way.

When learning something new, involve as many of the senses as you can. There are several different learning styles, and each uses a different sense to optimize their learning experience. Touch an object, associate it with a smell, look at it, and even have a taste that reminds you of what you want to learn. You will more effectively retain the information. Recalling the information will come easier as well.

As discussed in the beginning of this article, Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating disease that affects your memory. Watching your mother or father's memory, deteriorate in-front of your eyes, can be one of the most painful experiences that life has to offer. Apply the advice from this article to help you and your family cope with this devastating disease.

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